Wednesday, December 16, 2009

DOE Recovery Act - Weatherization Assistance Program Training Centers And Programs CFDA 81.042

The objective of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to develop new or expand existing weatherization training centers and training programs. The Department of Energy (DOE) will work with the selected entities to develop low-income weatherization training centers or programs that provide accelerated, standardized, and multi-tiered weatherization training. Applications are due by January 21, 2009.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FOA-0000220
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Dec 10, 2009
Creation Date: Dec 10, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jan 21, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jan 21, 2010
Archive Date:
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Energy
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 30
Estimated Total Program Funding: $30,000,000
Award Ceiling: $1,000,000
Award Floor: $100,000
CFDA Number(s): 81.042 -- Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Full Opportunity Annoucement
>>Read more >>

NEH Landmarks Workshops for School 2010 Teachers CFDA 45.163

The Landmarks of American History and Culture program supports series of one-week residence-based workshops for a national audience of K-12 educators. NEH Landmarks of American History and Culture workshops use historic sites to address central themes and issues in American history, government, literature, art, music, and other related subjects in the humanities. Applications are due by March 16, 2010.

The goals of the workshops are to increase knowledge and appreciation of subjects, ideas, and places significant to American history and culture; provide teachers with expertise in the use and interpretation of historical sites and of material and archival resources; and encourage historical and cultural sites to develop greater capacity and scale for professional development programs. NEH Landmarks workshops should be held at or near sites important to American history and culture (e.g., presidential residences or libraries; colonial-era settlements; major battlefields; historic districts; parks and preserves; sites of key economic, social, political, and constitutional developments; and places associated with major writers, artists, and musicians). Applicants should make a compelling case for the historical significance of the site(s), the material resources available for use, and the ways in which the site(s) will enhance the workshop.

Document Type: Grants Notice Funding
Opportunity Number: 20100316-BH
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Dec 15, 2009
Creation Date: Dec 15, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 16, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 16, 2010
Archive Date: Apr 15, 2010 Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 30
Estimated Total Program Funding: Award Ceiling: $180,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.163 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Professional Development Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/Landmarks.html

If you have difficulty accessing the full announcement electronically, please contact:
Landmarks of American History and Culture:
Workshops for School Teachers
Division of Education Programs
National Endowment for the Humanities
Room 302
1100 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20506
202-606-8463 landmarks@neh.gov
>>Read more >>

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

NARA Strategies and Tools for Archives and Historical Publishing Projects 2010 CFDA 89.003

The National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC), a part of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), supports projects that promote the preservation and use of America's documentary heritage essential to understanding our democracy, history, and culture. The Commission seeks proposals to develop new strategies and tools that can improve the preservation, public discovery, or use of historical records. First round applications are due by June 3, 2010.


There are two competitions each year in this category. Applicants may apply against either deadline.

First competition:

Funding Opportunity Number: STRATEGIES-201006
•Draft (optional): April 1, 2010
•Final Deadline: June 3, 2010
NHPRC support begins no earlier than January 1, 2011.

Second competition:

Funding Opportunity Number: STRATEGIES-201010
•Draft (optional) Deadline: August 2, 2010
•Final Deadline: October 7, 2010
NHPRC support begins no earlier than July 1, 2011.

Projects may also focus on techniques and tools that will improve the professional performance and effectiveness of those who work with such records, such as archivists, documentary editors, and records managers. Projects must anticipate results that will affect more than a single institution or a single state. If your project is focused on a single state, the proposal narrative must explain why the State Historical Records Advisory Board in your state cannot manage the proposed project. If staff review cannot confirm that the project includes the information, the application will be ineligible. Projects concerning records may focus on methods of working with any format including born-digital records. Publishing of historical records must focus on methods of presenting archival records as primary sources.

The Commission does not fund projects focused on artifacts or books. A grant normally is for one to three years. The Commission expects to make one to three grants of between $50,000 and $150,000. The total amount allocated to this category is up to $350,000.

The Commission requires that grant recipients acknowledge NHPRC grant assistance in all publications and other products that result from its support. Cost sharing is required. Cost sharing is the financial contribution the applicant pledges to the cost of a project. Cost sharing can include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. The Commission provides no more than 75% of total project costs.

Agency Contact
Applicants are encouraged to contact Lucy Barber, Deputy Executive Director, 202-357-5306, or lucy.barber@nara.gov who may:

•Advise the applicant about the review process;
•Answer questions about what activities are eligible for support;
•Supply samples of successful applications;
•Read and comment on a preliminary draft. Applicants should submit a draft at least 2 months before the deadline.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: STRATEGIES-201006
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Dec 08, 2009
Creation Date: Dec 08, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jun 03, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jun 03, 2010
Archive Date: Jul 03, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $150,000
Award Floor: $50,000
CFDA Number(s): 89.003 -- National Historical Publications and Records Grants
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

http://www.archives.gov/nhprc/announcement/strategies.html
>>Read more >>

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

NEA Universal Design Leadership Project, FY 2010, CFDA 45.024

An organization may not receive more than one Arts Endowment award for the same project during the same or an overlapping period of support. Period of Support The Arts Endowment’s support of this Cooperative Agreement can start no earlier than September 1, 2010. The period of support may extend for up to two years. Scope of Work The Arts Endowment seeks to enter into a Cooperative Agreement with an organization that will carry out a project to increase understanding, acceptance, and practice of universal design within the design profession, by design educators, and by the American public. Applications are due by February 9, 2010.


An organization may not receive more than one Arts Endowment award for the same project during the same or an overlapping period of support. Period of Support The Arts Endowment’s support of this Cooperative Agreement can start no earlier than September 1, 2010. The period of support may extend for up to two years.

Proposed projects should focus on extending the appeal of universal design from the disability community into the mainstream of American design and American society. The project should educate designers and others including developers, city planners, and consumers on this important issue. Proposed projects should focus on the design of spaces and/or landscapes and should: Involve collaboration with targeted populations. 11/23/09 Page - 3 Be of a scope comparable to, but not limited to, the leadership project examples cited above. Implement one or more of the recommendations in the NEA’s report on the October 2-3, 2003, meeting, “Envisioning Universal Design: Creating an Inclusive Society.”

For example, this might entail, as part of the project: -- Identifying, documenting, and disseminating information on projects that exemplify best practices in universal design and that make connections between designers, decision makers, and the disability community as well as the American public. -- Establishing alliances and developing projects with strategic partners, such as governmental or non-governmental entities whose existing infrastructure could benefit the goals of this initiative. -- Promoting an emphasis on universal design in design or design-related graduate and post-graduate programs by creating and incorporating into the curriculum universal design modules or by supporting research opportunities in universal design for students and faculty. -- Engaging public policy makers and raising their awareness so that universal design education can be integrated into their identified priorities. This might entail working with the Mayors' Institute on City Design® or other similar groups. The Arts Endowment encourages innovative ideas from the field. The proposal selected will form the basis for the Cooperative Agreement to be awarded. The Cooperator will work closely with the NEA Project Director on all phases of this project.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: NEAPS1003
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Nov 23, 2009
Creation Date: Nov 23, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Feb 09, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Feb 09, 2010 Proposal Receipt Deadline: February 9, 2010 The Arts Endowment requires organizations to submit their proposals electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your proposal no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on the deadline date above. We strongly recommend that you submit at least 10 days in advance of the deadline to give yourself ample time to resolve any problems that you might encounter.
Archive Date: Mar 11, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Estimated Total Program Funding: $65,000
Award Ceiling: $65,000
Award Floor: $65,000
CFDA Number(s): 45.024 -- Promotion of the Arts_Grants to Organizations and Individuals
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

http://www.nea.gov/grants/apply/RFP/UnivDesign.html
>>Read more >>

Thursday, November 19, 2009

NEH 2010 Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants CFDA 45.169

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invites applications to the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program. This program is designed to encourage innovations in the digital humanities. By awarding relatively small grants to support the planning stages, NEH aims to encourage the development of innovative projects that promise to benefit the humanities. Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities. Applications are due by March 23, 2010.


Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve research that brings new approaches or documents best practices in the study of the digital humanities; planning and developing prototypes of new digital tools for preserving, analyzing, and making accessible digital resources, including libraries’ and museums’ digital assets; scholarship that examines the philosophical implications and impact of the use of emerging technologies; innovative uses of technology for public programming and education utilizing both traditional and new media; and new digital modes of publication that facilitate the dissemination of humanities scholarship in advanced academic as well as informal or formal educational settings at all academic levels.

Innovation is a hallmark of this grant category. All applicants must propose an innovative approach, method, tool, or idea that has not been used before in the humanities. These grants are modeled, in part, on the “high risk/high reward” paradigm often used by funding agencies in the sciences. NEH is requesting proposals for projects that take some risks in the pursuit of innovation and excellence. Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants should result in plans, prototypes, or proofs of concept for long-term digital humanities projects prior to implementation. Two levels of awards will be made in this program.

Level I awards are small grants designed to fund brainstorming sessions, workshops, early alpha-level prototypes, and initial planning.

Level II awards are larger grants that can be used for more fully-formed projects that are ready to begin implementation or the creation of working prototypes. Applicants must state in their narrative which funding level they seek. Applicants should carefully choose the funding level appropriate to the needs of the proposed project. See Section II, Award Information, for more details.

Awards are for up to eighteen months.
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants have two levels of funding:
Level I Grants range from $5,000 to $25,000 in outright funding.
Level II Grants range from $25,001 to $50,000 in outright funding.
(Learn more about different types of grant funding.)
In the narrative, applicants must specify which level of funding they seek.

Cost sharing
Cost sharing consists of the cash contributions made to a project by the applicant and third parties, as well as third party in-kind contributions, such as donated services and goods. Cost sharing is not required for Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants. However, applicants are welcome to use cost sharing for start-up projects in which the total budget exceeds the NEH grant limit.

Subsequent project phases
As the name implies, Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants support the initial phases of digital projects. Other NEH funding programs can support subsequent phases; however, the receipt of a Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant does not imply (let alone guarantee) continued support beyond the completion of the grant.

Document Type: Modification to Previous Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20100323-HD
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Nov 18, 2009
Creation Date: Nov 19, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Mar 23, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Mar 23, 2010
Archive Date: Apr 22, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 40
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $50,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.169 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Digital Humanities Initiative
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/digitalhumanitiesstartup.html
>>Read more >>

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

NEH Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities CFDA 45.169

These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities. Applications are due by February 17, 2010.


The projects may be a single opportunity or offered multiple times to different audiences. Institutes may be as short as a few days and held at multiple locations or as long as six weeks at a single site. The duration of a program should allow for full and thorough treatment of the topic.

Today, complex data—its form, manipulation, and interpretation—are as important to humanities study as more traditional research materials. Datasets, for example, may represent digitized historical records, high-quality image data, or even multimedia collections, all of which are increasing in number due to the availability and affordability of mass data storage devices and international initiatives to create digital content. Moreover, extensive networking capabilities, sophisticated middleware applications, and new collaboration platforms are simultaneously providing and improving interactive access to and analysis of these data as well as a multitude of other resources. The Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities program seeks to enable humanities scholars in the United States to incorporate advances like these into their scholarship and teaching.

Awards normally range from one to three years and from $50,000 to a maximum of $250,000. Successful applicants will be awarded a grant in outright funds, federal matching funds, or a combination of the two, depending on the applicant’s preference and the availability of NEH funds. Matching funds are released when a grantee secures gift funds from eligible third parties.

Cost sharing
Cost sharing consists of the cash contributions made to the project by the applicant, third parties, and other federal agencies, as well as third-party in-kind contributions, such as donated services and goods. Cost sharing also includes program registration fees and gift money that will be raised to release federal matching funds.

Although cost sharing is not required, NEH is rarely able to support the full costs of projects approved for funding. In most cases, NEH grants cover no more than 80 percent of project costs.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20100217-HT
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Nov 09, 2009
Creation Date: Nov 09, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Feb 17, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Feb 17, 2010
Archive Date: Mar 19, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 10
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $250,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.169 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Digital Humanities Initiative
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/IATDH.html
>>Read more >>

Monday, November 9, 2009

IMLS 2010 Museum Grants for African American History and Culture CFDA 45.309

Museum Grants for African American History and Culture are intended to enhance institutional capacity and sustainability through professional training, technical assistance, internships, outside expertise, and other tools. Successful proposals will focus on one or more of the following three goals: (1) developing or strengthening knowledge, skills, and other expertise of current staff at African American museums; (2) attracting and retaining professionals with the skills needed to strengthen African American museums; and (3) attracting new staff to African American museum practice and providing them with the expertise needed to sustain them in the museum field. Applications are due by January 15, 2010.


Grant Amount: $5,000-$150,000
Grant Period: Up to two years

IMLS will be holding a conference call to answer questions about applications, procedures, etc. on Friday, November 20, at 2pm (ET), 1 hour call. Those wishing to join the conference call should phone 800/603-9527 and when prompted, provide the conference id, # 39707992.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: AAHC-FY10
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Oct 15, 2009
Creation Date: Oct 15, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jan 15, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jan 15, 2010
Archive Date: Feb 14, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $150,000
Award Floor: $5,000
CFDA Number(s): 45.309 -- Museum Grants for African American History and Culture
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

http://www.imls.gov/applicants/grants/AfricanAmerican.shtm
>>Read more >>

Thursday, November 5, 2009

NEH Challenge Grants in United States History and Culture CFDA 45.130

NEH invites applications for Challenge Grants in United States History and Culture. This grant opportunity is designed to help institutions and organizations strengthen their ability to explore significant themes and events in American history, so as to advance our understanding of how—since the nation’s founding—these events have shaped and been shaped by American identity and culture. Applications are due by February 3, 2010.


NEH seeks to support a range of approaches to the American experience: for example, approaches might explore significant events in America’s history, its democratic institutions, the political principles on which the nation is founded, or the complicated mix of peoples and cultures that have formed America. Also welcome are proposals that seek support for the study of the history and culture of the United States in international contexts rather than in isolation—proposals that explore relationships with other nations and cultures that have profoundly affected the course of United States history. NEH also welcomes proposals for programming at America’s historic places (e.g., historic sites, neighborhoods, communities, or larger geographical regions).

NEH challenge grants are capacity-building grants, intended to help institutions and organizations secure long-term improvements in and support for their humanities programs and resources. Grants may be used to establish or enhance endowments or spend-down funds (that is, funds that are invested, with both the income and the principal being expended over a defined period of years) that generate expendable earnings to support ongoing program activities. Funds may also be used for one-time capital expenditures (such as construction and renovation, purchase of equipment, and acquisitions) that bring long-term benefits to the institution and to the humanities more broadly.

Because of the matching requirement, these NEH grants also strengthen the humanities by encouraging nonfederal sources of support. Applications are welcome from colleges and universities, museums, public libraries, research institutions, historical societies and historic sites, scholarly associations, state humanities councils, and other nonprofit entities. Programs that involve collaboration among multiple institutions are eligible as well, but one institution must serve as the lead agent and formal applicant of record.

Document Type: Modification to Previous Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20100203-CZ
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Nov 04, 2009
Creation Date: Nov 04, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Feb 03, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Feb 03, 2010
Archive Date: Mar 05, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 25
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $1,000,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.130 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Challenge Grants
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/CG_UShistory.html
>>Read more >>

Monday, October 26, 2009

NEH America's Media Makers Production Grants CFDA 45.164

Grants for America’s Media Makers support projects in the humanities that explore stories, ideas, and beliefs that deepen our understanding of our lives and our world. The Division of Public Programs supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excite, inform, and stir thoughtful reflection upon culture, identity, and history in creative and new ways. Grants for America’s Media Makers should encourage dialogue, discussion, and civic engagement, and they should foster learning among people of all ages. To that end, the Division of Public Programs urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public.

NEH offers two categories of grants for media projects, Development Grants and Production Grants.

Development grants enable media producers to collaborate with scholars to develop humanities content and format and to prepare programs for production. Development grants should culminate in the refinement of a project’s humanities ideas, a script, or a design document for (or a prototype of) digital media components or projects, or a prototype for a digital media project together with a detailed plan for outreach and public engagement in collaboration with partner organizations.

Production grants support the preparation of a program for distribution. Applicants must submit a script for a radio or television program, or a prototype or storyboard for a digital media project, that demonstrates a solid command of the humanities ideas and scholarship related to a subject. The script for a radio or television program, or prototype or storyboard for a digital media project, must also show how the narrative elements, visual approach, and interactive design combine to present the project’s humanities ideas. Applicants must have consulted with appropriate scholars about the project and obtained their commitment as advisers. Finally, applicants must have recruited the media team, including at a minimum the producer, director, writer, and, for a digital media project, the interactive designer. Applications may be submitted for any phase of a project.

Applicants are not required to obtain a development grant before applying for a production grant. Applicants may not, however, submit multiple applications for the same project at the same deadline. An applicant must choose whether to apply for development or production of a particular project. If an application for a project is already under review, another application for the same project cannot be accepted.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20100113-TR
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Oct 15, 2009
Creation Date: Oct 15, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Jan 13, 2010
Current Closing Date for Applications: Jan 13, 2010
Archive Date: Feb 12, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $1,000,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.164 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Public Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/AmMediaMakers_production.html
>>Read more >>

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

EPA Brownfields Job Training Grants CFDA 66.815

The Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act (“Brownfields Law”, P.L. 107-118) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to publish guidance to assist applicants in preparing proposals for grants. This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from eligible entities, including non-profit organizations to deliver environmental job training. Applicants must propose to serve a community that currently receives, or has received, financial assistance from EPA for a brownfields assessment, revolving loan fund, or cleanup grant, a targeted brownfield assessment, and/or site-specific brownfields work carried out under a state or tribal response program. Applications are due by December 1, 2009.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: EPA-OSWER-OBLR-09-07
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Sep 30, 2009
Creation Date: Sep 30, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Dec 01, 2009 Please refer to the full announcement, including Section IV, for additional information on submission methods and due dates.
Current Closing Date for Applications: Dec 01, 2009 Please refer to the full announcement, including Section IV, for additional information on submission methods and due dates.
Archive Date: Dec 31, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Environment
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 13
Estimated Total Program Funding: $2,600,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:
CFDA Number(s): 66.815 -- Brownfields Job Training Grants
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

BROWNFIELDS JOB TRAINING GRANTS

>>Read more >>

Monday, September 21, 2009

USDA 2010 National Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost Share Grant CFDA 10.675

The Secretary of Agriculture has a congressionally designated advisory Council that assists the U.S. Forest Service in establishing the grant categories and recommending the final proposals for the Forest Service to consider. This is the National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (Council). The Council serves to advise the Secretary of Agriculture on the status of the nation’s urban and community forests and related natural resources. The Council seeks to establish sustainable urban and community forests, by encouraging communities of all sizes to manage and protect their natural resources, which can, if well managed, improve the public’s health, well being, and economic vitality, and create resilient ecosystems for present and future generations. Applications are due by December 15, 2009.


Urban and Community Forestry Program Requirements through the U.S. Forest Service’s competitive Urban and Community Forestry Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program, the Council only supports urban and community forestry projects that have national or widespread application and impact. All proposals must apply to Urban and Community Forestry program authorities as designated by Congress in the Cooperative Forestry Assistance Act (Section 9) [Section 9 Urban and Community Forestry only (PDF, pp. 19-24)] and the annual criteria set forth by the Council.


A listing of the previously funded projects can be viewed at www.fs.fed.us/ucf/nucfac. Definition of Urban and Community Forestry: The art, science, and technology of managing trees, forests, and natural systems in and around cities, suburbs, and towns for the health and well-being of all people.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-FS-UCF-01-2010
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Sep 21, 2009
Creation Date: Sep 21, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Dec 15, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Dec 15, 2009
Archive Date: Jan 14, 2010
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Natural Resources
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 10
Estimated Total Program Funding: $900,000
Award Ceiling: $0
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 10.675 -- Urban and Community Forestry Program
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes


>>Read more >>

Thursday, September 10, 2009

CNCS National Planning Grants and Indian Tribes Planning Grants CFDA 94.006

The purpose of planning grants is to support the development of AmeriCorps programs so applicants are better prepared to compete for a multi-state AmeriCorps grant in the following grant cycle. These grants are awarded for 12 months. They may not be used to support AmeriCorps members. National Planning Grant applicants must not have previously received a multi-state AmeriCorps grant and must be interested in applying for AmeriCorps funding for a program that will operate in two or more states. Indian Tribes Planning Grant applicants must not have received an AmeriCorps grant in the past and must be an Indian Tribe. Applications must be submitted using eGrants and not through Grants.gov. Applications are due by October 19, 2009.


When will the grants be awarded?
Contingent upon appropriations, the grants will be awarded in late January 2010 so that successful applicants will have a full year to prepare for their competitive application which will be due in January of 2011, again contingent upon appropriations.

What are the matching requirements for these grants?
Applicants must provide 24% of the total project cost in match. Match may be cash or in-kind. The Corporation complies with Executive Order 13175 and will handle any waiver request from an Indian Tribe in an expedited manner.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: CNCS-GRANTS-09092009-001
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Sep 09, 2009
Creation Date: Sep 09, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 19, 2009 Applications must be submitted using eGrants. Applications must arrive at the Corporation by the indicated date and time in order to be considered on time.
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 19, 2009 Applications must be submitted using eGrants. Applications must arrive at the Corporation by the indicated date and time in order to be considered on time.
Archive Date: Oct 20, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant

Category of Funding Activity: Community Development
Disaster Prevention and Relief
Education
Employment, Labor and Training
Environment
Food and Nutrition
Health
Housing
Law, Justice and Legal Services
Natural Resources
Regional Development

Category Explanation: National Planning Grants Public or private nonprofit organizations, including labor organizations; faith-based and other community organizations; institutions of higher education; government entities within states or territories (e.g., cities, counties); Indian Tribes; or partnerships or consortia operating in more than one state are eligible. Community-based organizations, including faith-based organizations and intermediary organizations operating in more than one state are encouraged to apply for planning grants. Indian Tribes Planning Grants Indian Tribes are eligible to apply. Indian Tribe is defined as a federally recognized Indian Tribe, band, nation, or other organized group or community, including any Native village, Regional Corporation, or Village Corporation, as defined under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. § 1602), that the United States Government determines is eligible for special programs and services provided under federal law to Indians because of their status as Indians. Indian Tribes also include tribal organizations controlled, sanctioned, or chartered by one of the entities described above.
Expected Number of Awards: 5
Estimated Total Program Funding: $250,000
Award Ceiling:
Award Floor:
CFDA Number(s): 94.006 -- CFDA Update to Include ARRA - Americorps
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

Full Announcement Description
>>Read more >>

Thursday, September 3, 2009

NCPTT 2010 Call for Proposals CFDA 15.923

The National Center for Preservation Technology & Training (NCPTT) seeks innovative projects that advance the application of science and technology to historic preservation. The PTT Grants program funds projects that develop new technologies or adapt existing technologies to preserve cultural resources. Projects may include, but are not limited to:

  • laboratory or field research that explores or assesses novel or adaptive methods;
  • training activities, including workshops, and course or curriculum development that promote the use of new or adaptive technologies;
  • documentation using new methods;
  • manuscript or website development that disseminates innovative preservation technologies; and
  • meetings that convene experts to discuss the use of technologies to address preservation problems.

NCPTT does not fund “bricks and mortar” projects or straight-forward documentation projects using well-established methods. Grants are awarded competitively with a maximum award of $25,000 (including indirect costs). All grants require a one-to-one match of cash or in-kind services. Source of the match may be federal or non-federal resources. Grants are funded by annual federal appropriation and are subject to availability of funds. Application are submitted directly to NCPTT and not through Grants.gov. Applications are due by October 15, 2009.


Research Priorities:
NCPTT funds projects within several overlapping disciplinary areas. These include: archeology, collections management, architecture, engineering, historic landscapes, and materials research.

Although any proposal will be considered that advances NCPTT’s mission, NCPTT will give preference to proposals that advance technologies or methods to:

  • conserve cultural resources of the “recent past,”
  • monitor and evaluate preservation treatments,
  • investigate minimally invasive techniques to inventory and assess cultural resources
    protect cultural resources against natural and human threats,
  • preserve cemeteries and places of worship, and
  • safeguard resources from effects of pollution and climate.

Who Is Eligible
The following organizations are eligible to submit proposals:

  • U.S. universities and colleges,
  • U.S. non-profit organizations: Museums, research laboratories, professional societies and similar organizations in the U.S. that are directly associated with educational or research activity, and
  • Government agencies in the U.S.: National Park Service and other federal, state, territorial and local government agencies, as well as Hawaiian Natives, Native American and Alaska Native tribes and their Tribal Historic Preservation Offices.

Other organizations can participate only as contractors to eligible U.S. partners. Grants funds support only portions of projects that are undertaken or managed directly by U.S. partners. Grant funds can be used in support of projects outside of the U.S., provided the principal organization conducting the work is an eligible U.S. institution and the project’s results address a national preservation need.

Review Criteria
Reviewers evaluate each project proposal by the following criteria. The successful proposed project should thoroughly:

  • address an identifiable national need in preservation technology,
  • present innovate technologies,
  • demonstrate a technically sound methodology,
  • have a principal investigator well qualified to conduct the proposed work,
  • disseminate project results effectively,
  • be cost effective given the scope of work and the audience,
  • provide a one-to-one match of funding with cash or in-kind services, and
  • result in tangible grant products that disseminate information beyond traditional ways (e.g. online web based training, webinars, podcasts, videos, DVDs, electronic publishing, etc.).

Other Considerations
NCPTT reviews proposals for disciplinary, geographical and institutional distribution. Additionally, a National Park Service grants administrator reviews them for financial and policy matters. Special consideration will be given to proposals that leverage resources through public and private partnerships.

The Grant Application Process
Applicants desiring assistance may submit an optional preproposal anytime up to October 1, 2009. The preproposal may not exceed one page in length, and it should be an informal abstract of the project. Provide a brief description that highlights the innovative nature of the project, how it applies to preservation technology, the national need, the time frame, and approximate overall cost. NCPTT staff will provide timely feedback on the degree of fit between your preproposal and NCPTT’s mission.
Applicants must submit a PTT Grant application between September 1, 2009 and October 15, 2009.

The applicant will provide details on the following:

  • abstract (100 words)
  • description of innovation (100 words)
  • project narrative, which should include a discussion of the technical soundness of the methods (1000 words)
  • a bibliography of references cited in the narrative
  • statement about how the project addresses an identifiable national need in preservation technology (250 words)
  • a list of project tasks and their schedule (500 words)
  • a dissemination plan (250 words)
  • a description of the deliverables (500 words)
  • summary of the expertise and project-related experience of the principal investigator (500 words)
  • summary of the expertise and project-related experience of the research team (1000 words)
  • an itemized budget listing the funds requested from NCPTT, as well as the funds provided in cash and in-kind donation from other parties, and
  • listing of congressional district and names of congressional representatives.

NCPTT internal review panels provide their evaluations around November 5, 2009.
A national panel meets to evaluate finalists around November 17, 2009.
Applicants will receive notification of their status in early December, 2009.
Successful projects can begin in March 1, 2010, pending availability of funding.

NCPTT Website

NCPTT Application


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Thursday, August 27, 2009

IMLS: Museums for America CFDA 45.301

Museums for America is the Institute’s largest grant program for museums, supporting projects and ongoing activities that build museums’ capacity to serve their communities. Museums for America grants strengthen a museum’s ability to serve the public more effectively by supporting high-priority activities that advance the institution’s mission and strategic goals. Museums for America grants are designed to be flexible: funds can be used for a wide variety of projects, including: ongoing museum work, research and other behind-the-scenes activities, planning, new programs, purchase of equipment or services, and activities that will support the efforts of museums to upgrade and integrate new technologies. Grants are awarded in the following categories: Engaging Communities (Education, Exhibitions, and Interpretation); Building Institutional Capacity (Management, Policy, and Training); and Collections Stewardship. Applications are due by November 2, 2009


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: MFA-FY10
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Aug 26, 2009
Creation Date: Aug 26, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Nov 02, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Nov 02, 2009
Archive Date: Dec 02, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA) Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 150
Estimated Total Program Funding: $17,000,000
Award Ceiling: $150,000
Award Floor: $5,000
CFDA Number(s): 45.301 -- Museums for America
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes
Eligible Applicants
Others (see text field entitled "Additional Information on Eligibility" for clarification)

Additional Information on Eligibility:
All types of museums, large and small, are eligible for funding. Eligible museums include aquariums, arboretums and botanical gardens, art museums, youth museums, general museums, historic houses and sites, history museums, nature centers, natural history and anthropology museums, planetariums, science and technology centers, specialized museums, and zoological parks. Federally operated and for-profit museums may not apply for IMLS funds.

An eligible applicant must be: either a unit of state or local government or a private not-for-profit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code; located in one of the fifty states of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated states of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and a museum that, using a professional staff, (1) is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; (2) owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; (3) cares for these objects; and (4) exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities which it owns or operates.

An organization uses a professional staff if it employs at least one professional staff member, or the fulltime equivalent, whether paid or unpaid primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution.

An organization “exhibits objects to the general public” if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. Further, an organization which exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year shall be deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An organization which exhibits objects by appointment may meet the requirement to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis, if it can establish, in light of the facts under all the relevant circumstances, that this method of exhibition does not unreasonably restrict the accessibility of the institution's exhibits to the general public. Please note that an organization which does not have as a primary purpose the exhibition of objects to the general public but which can demonstrate that it exhibits objects to the general public on a regular basis as a significant, separate, distinct, and continuing portion of its activities, and that it otherwise meets the museum eligibility requirements, may be determined to be eligible as a museum under these guidelines.

A museum located within a parent organization that is a state or local government or multipurpose non-profit entity, such as a municipality, university, historical society, foundation, or a cultural center, may apply on its own behalf, if the museum: (1) is able to independently fulfill all the eligibility requirements listed above; (2) functions as a discrete unit within the parent organization; (3) has its own fully segregated and itemized operating budget; and (4) has the authority to make the application on its own. When any of the last three conditions cannot be met, a museum may apply through its parent organization. Prospective applicants that cannot fulfill all of these requirements should contact IMLS to discuss their eligibility before applying. IMLS may require additional supporting documentation from the applicant to determine the museum’s autonomy. Each eligible applicant within a single parent organization should clearly delineate its own programs and operations in the application narrative. A parent organization that controls multiple museums that are not autonomous but which are otherwise eligible may submit only one application per grant program; the application may be submitted by the parent organization on behalf of one or more of the eligible museums.

http://www.imls.gov/applicants/grants/forAmerica.shtm

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Thursday, August 20, 2009

Helping Johnny Walk to School: Sustaining Communities through Smart Policies Request for Proposal (Round 2)

Driven by concerns about the abandonment of older neighborhood schools and the siting of new schools outside of communities, the National Trust is offering a 12-month program to help organizations secure community-centered schools through implementation of state-level policies and practices. Through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Trust will select organizations in up to three states to receive a year of technical assistance and a $6,000 grant to: 1) research state policies and practices; 2) convene stakeholders to develop recommendations; 3) develop educational materials; and 4) publicly share policy findings. By participating in this program, organizations will help localities within their state site their schools in a way that not only achieves their educational objectives, but also anchors the local neighborhood, supports better public health, creates a cleaner environment, spurs economic development, and offers additional amenities to the community. Applications are due by September 16, 2009.

This is the second round of grants; in 2008, we provided six sub-grants to organizations in California, Illinois, New Hampshire, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.

Through this grant and with help from the project’s Advisory Committee, the National Trust will provide grantees with the following technical assistance:

  • up-to-date research on issues affecting community-centered schools;
  • access to a network of policy experts and peer mentors;
  • help with placing state policy and practices in a national context; and
  • an in-state visit to your state by a policy expert or peer mentor to provide examples from other states and/or speak to a convening of stakeholders.

This program will help a nonprofit organization or coalition working on school policies, leverage their existing resources to:

  • research and summarize state policies and practices that impact school siting decisions;
  • create a network of interested stakeholders across the state;
  • develop policy recommendations;
  • develop a public information campaign to increase visibility of the issue statewide; and
  • ensure state-level policies and practices encourage community-centered schools.

FINANCIAL COMMITMENT: Each grantee will receive 12 months (October 2009 – October 2010) of technical assistance and a $6,000 grant to help encourage community-centered schools through state-level policies and practices. Selected grantees will be required to:

  • provide an in-kind match to cover costs of convening stakeholders (e.g., space rental, audio-visual equipment, catering, photo-copying, etc.);
  • provide one-night of lodging for a mentoring visit by a policy expert or peer mentor (if such guidance is requested by sub-grantee, the National Trust will cover travel costs); and
  • print and distribute educational materials (e.g., policy briefs, Fact Sheets, etc.).

This project is funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the conditions of which will be passed down to the successful grantee. Organizations unable or unwilling to comply with the standard conditions outlined in CFR40 Part 30, should not reply.

GRANTEE SELECTION PROCESS: To apply, organizations should submit the application form with supporting materials by September 16, 2009 at 5:00 p.m. eastern time.

For more information about this issue and details about applying for this new grant opportunity, visit preservationnation.org/issues/historic-schools
or contact Renee Viers Kuhlman, Director of Special Projects, Center for State and Local Policy, at Phone: 202-588-6234, e-mail: renee_kuhlman@nthp.org.

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Wednesday, August 19, 2009

NEH Collaborative Research Grants CFDA 45.161

Collaborative Research Grants support original research undertaken by a team of two or more scholars or research coordinated by an individual scholar that, because of its scope or complexity, requires additional staff and resources beyond the individual's salary. Eligible projects include: research that significantly adds to knowledge and understanding in the humanities; conferences on topics of major importance in the humanities that will benefit ongoing research; archaeological projects that include the interpretation and communication of results (projects may encompass excavation, materials analysis, laboratory work, field reports, and preparation of interpretive monographs); translations into English of works that provide insight into the history, literature, philosophy, and artistic achievements of other cultures; and research that uses the knowledge, methods, and perspectives of the humanities to enhance understanding of science, technology, medicine, and the social sciences. These grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods of one to three years. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; field work; applications of information technology; and technical support and services. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to the appropriate scholarly and public audiences. Applications are due by October 29, 2009.

Providing Access to Grant Products As a taxpayer-supported federal agency, the NEH endeavors to make the products of its grants available to the broadest possible audience. Our goal is for scholars, educators, students, and the American public to have ready and easy access to the wide range of NEH grant products. For the Collaborative Research program, such products may include monographs, excavation reports, multi-authored volumes, Web sites, and the like. For projects that lead to the development of Web sites, all other considerations being equal, the NEH gives preference to those that provide free access to the public.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20091029-RZ
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Aug 11, 2009
Creation Date: Aug 11, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 29, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 29, 2009
Archive Date: Nov 28, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 10
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $300,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s):45.161 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Research
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/Collaborative.html
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Monday, July 27, 2009

IMLS Conservation Project Support CFDA 45.303

The Conservation Project Support program awards grants to help museums identify conservation needs and priorities, and perform activities to ensure the safekeeping of their collections. Conservation Project Support grants help museums develop and implement a logical, institution-wide approach to caring for their living and material collections. Applicants should apply for the project that meets one of the institution’s highest conservation needs. All applications must demonstrate that the primary goal of the project is conservation care, and not collection management or maintenance. Grants are available for many types of conservation activities, including surveys (general, detailed condition, or environmental); training; treatment; and environmental improvements. Application deadline is October 1, 2009.


Document Type: Modification to Previous Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: CPS-FY10
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jul 21, 2009
Creation Date: Jul 21, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 01, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 01, 2009
Archive Date: Oct 31, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $150,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.303 -- Conservation Project Support
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes


All types of museums, large and small, are eligible for funding. Eligible museums include aquariums, arboretums and botanical gardens, art museums, youth museums, general museums, historic houses and sites, history museums, nature centers, natural history and anthropology museums, planetariums, science and technology centers, specialized museums, and zoological parks. Federally operated and for-profit museums may not apply for IMLS funds.

An eligible applicant must be: either a unit of state or local government or a private not-for-profit organization that has tax-exempt status under the Internal Revenue Code; located in one of the fifty states of the United States of America, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated states of Micronesia, or the Republic of Palau; and a museum that, using a professional staff, (1) is organized on a permanent basis for essentially educational or aesthetic purposes; (2) owns or uses tangible objects, either animate or inanimate; (3) cares for these objects; and (4) exhibits these objects to the general public on a regular basis through facilities which it owns or operates. An organization uses a professional staff if it employs at least one professional staff member, or the fulltime equivalent, whether paid or unpaid primarily engaged in the acquisition, care, or exhibition to the public of objects owned or used by the institution. An organization “exhibits objects to the general public” if such exhibition is a primary purpose of the institution. Further, an organization which exhibits objects to the general public for at least 120 days a year shall be deemed to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis. An organization which exhibits objects by appointment may meet the requirement to exhibit objects to the general public on a regular basis, if it can establish, in light of the facts under all the relevant circumstances, that this method of exhibition does not unreasonably restrict the accessibility of the institution's exhibits to the general public. Please note that an organization which does not have as a primary purpose the exhibition of objects to the general public. but which can demonstrate that it exhibits objects to the general public on a regular basis as a significant, separate, distinct, and continuing portion of its activities, and that it otherwise meets the museum eligibility requirements, may be determined to be eligible as a museum under these guidelines. A museum located within a parent organization that is a state or local government or multipurpose non-profit entity, such as a municipality, university, historical society, foundation, or a cultural center, may apply on its own behalf, if the museum: (1) is able to independently fulfill all the eligibility requirements listed above; (2) functions as a discrete unit within the parent organization; (3) has its own fully segregated and itemized operating budget; and (4) has the authority to make the application on its own. When any of the last three conditions cannot be met, a museum may apply through its parent organization.

Prospective applicants that cannot fulfill all of these requirements should contact IMLS to discuss their eligibility before applying. IMLS may require additional supporting documentation from the applicant to determine the museum’s autonomy. Each eligible applicant within a single parent organization should clearly delineate its own programs and operations in the application narrative. A parent organization that controls multiple museums that are not autonomous but which are otherwise eligible may submit only one application per grant program; the application may be submitted by the parent organization on behalf of one or more of the eligible museums.

http://www.imls.gov/applicants/grants/pdf/CPS_2010.pdf
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NEH Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants CFDA 45.169

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) invites applications to the Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants program. This program is designed to encourage innovations in the digital humanities. By awarding relatively small grants to support the planning stages, NEH aims to encourage the development of innovative projects that promise to benefit the humanities. Applications are due by October 6, 2009.


Proposals should be for the planning or initial stages of digital initiatives in any area of the humanities. Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants may involve:

  • research that brings new approaches or documents best practices in the study of the digital humanities
  • planning and developing prototypes of new digital tools for preserving, analyzing, and making accessible digital resources, including libraries’ and museums’ digital assets
  • scholarship that examines the philosophical implications and impact of the use of emerging technologies
  • innovative uses of technology for public programming and education utilizing both traditional and new media; and new digital modes of publication that facilitate the dissemination of humanities scholarship in advanced academic as well as informal or formal educational settings at all academic levels.

Innovation is a hallmark of this grant category. All applicants must propose an innovative approach, method, tool, or idea that has not been used before in the humanities. These grants are modeled, in part, on the “high risk/high reward” paradigm often used by funding agencies in the sciences. NEH is requesting proposals for projects that take some risks in the pursuit of innovation and excellence.


Two levels of awards will be made in this program.
Level I awards are small grants designed to fund brainstorming sessions, workshops, early alpha-level prototypes, and initial planning.
Level II awards are larger grants that can be used for more fully-formed projects that are ready to begin implementation or the creation of working prototypes. Applicants must state in their narrative which funding level they seek. Applicants should carefully choose the funding level appropriate to the needs of the proposed project. See Section II, Award Information, for more details.

Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants support full-time or part-time activities for periods up to eighteen months. Support is available for various combinations of scholars, consultants, and research assistants; project-related travel; and technical support and services. Up to 20 percent of the total grant may be used for the acquisition of computing hardware and software. All grantees are expected to communicate the results of their work to appropriate scholarly and public audiences. In order to facilitate dissemination and increase the impact of the projects that are ultimately developed through Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants, applicants are strongly encouraged to employ open-source and fully accessible software.
Successful applicants will be expected to create a “lessons learned” white paper. This white paper should document the project, including lessons learned, so that others can benefit from the grantees’ experience. This white paper will be posted on the NEH Web site.

Awards are for up to eighteen months.
Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants have two levels of funding:
Level I Grants range from $5,000 to $25,000 in outright funding.
Level II Grants range from $25,001 to $50,000 in outright funding.

In the narrative, applicants must specify which level of funding they seek.

Cost Sharing
Cost sharing is not required for Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants. However, applicants are welcome to use cost sharing for start-up projects in which the total budget exceeds the NEH grant limit. Cost sharing consists of the cash contributions made to the project by the applicant and third parties, as well as third party in-kind contributions, such as donated services and goods.

Subsequent Project Phases
As the name implies, Digital Humanities Start-Up Grants support the initial phases of digital projects. Other NEH funding programs can support subsequent phases; however, the receipt of a Digital Humanities Start-Up Grant does not imply (let alone guarantee) continued support beyond the completion of the grant.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20091006-HD
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jul 15, 2009
Creation Date: Jul 15, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 06, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 06, 2009
Archive Date: Nov 05, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $50,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.169 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Digital Humanities Initiative
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

>>Read more >>

Wednesday, July 1, 2009

NEH America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Implementation Grants CFDA 45.164

America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations grants support projects in the humanities that explore stories, ideas, and beliefs that deepen our understanding of our lives and our world. The Division of Public Programs supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excite, inform, and stir thoughtful reflection upon culture, identity, and history in creative and new ways. Grants for America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations should encourage dialogue, discussion, and civic engagement, and they should foster learning among people of all ages. Applications are due by August 26, 2009.

To that end, the Division of Public Programs urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public. Implementation grants support the final preparation of a project for presentation to the public. Applicants must submit a full walkthrough for an exhibition, or a prototype or storyboard for a digital project, that demonstrates a solid command of the humanities ideas and scholarship that relate to the subject. Applicants for implementation grants should have already done most of the planning for their projects, including the identification of the key humanities themes, relevant scholarship, and program formats. For exhibitions, implementation grants can support the final stages of design development, but these grants are primarily intended for installation. Applicants are not required to obtain a planning grant before applying for an implementation grant. Applicants may not, however, submit multiple applications for the same project at the same deadline. If an application for a project is already under review, another application for the same project cannot be accepted. See application guidelines for Planning Grants.

The goals of Interpreting America’s Historic Places are to enhance lifelong learning in American history by connecting significant events, people, ideas, stories, and traditions with specific places; foster the development of interpretive programs for the public that address central events, themes, and issues in American history; and encourage consultation with humanities scholars and history organizations in the development of heritage tourism destinations.


Interpreting America’s Historic Places projects should interpret a place that played a significant role in American history; enrich the visitor experience at one or more historic places by interpreting these places in light of broader themes in American history; make use of the specific features of one or more historic places—the site, its location, buildings, or other natural or built features—as integral parts of the proposed interpretation; build on sound humanities scholarship; involve humanities scholars in all phases of development and implementation; approach the subject thematically, analytically, and interpretively through an appropriate variety of perspectives; interest broad audiences; and employ appealing and accessible program formats that will actively engage the public in learning.

To ensure that the humanities ideas are well conceived, projects must use a team of scholars who represent major fields relevant to the subject matter and offer diverse perspectives and approaches. Projects may also include other participants with experience and knowledge appropriate to the project’s formats or technical requirements.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20090826-GI
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 22, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 22, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Archive Date: Sep 25, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation: Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $1,000,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.164 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Public Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/AHCO_ImplementationGuidelines.html


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NEA American Masterpieces: Presenting, FY 2010 CFDA 45.024

American Masterpieces: Three Centuries of Artistic Genius is a major initiative to acquaint Americans with the best of their cultural and artistic legacy. Through American Masterpieces, the National Endowment for the Arts will sponsor performances, exhibitions, tours, and educational programs across all art forms that will reach large and small communities in all 50 states. This component of American Masterpieces will celebrate the extraordinary and rich contribution that presenting organizations make in American communities. Through American Masterpieces: Presenting, presentations of the performing, visual, media, design, and literary arts of the highest quality will be experienced by Americans in communities across the nation. Applications are due by September 24, 2009.

This category is for projects that embrace multiple arts disciplines. Projects must consist of either a single multidisciplinary project or a multidisciplinary series comprised of several different single-discipline presentations. Projects with components that primarily feature or support a single discipline (e.g., dance, music, musical theater, opera, visual arts) will not be considered. If you have questions as to whether your project qualifies as multidisciplinary, consult with the Presenting staff before preparing an application. Presenting organizations of all sizes, genres, and aesthetics are encouraged to apply.

Projects may be initiated by: • Networks of presenters. • College or university presenters. • Local, regional, or national presenters. • National service organizations and their networks. The Arts Endowment plans to support a variety of multidisciplinary presentations that are artistically, historically, and culturally significant and that reflect the full breadth of genres. Presenters may define master artists or masterworks within their own context, community vision, or goals. Projects or series may focus on but are not limited to: • Masterpieces from the American classical canon. • Revivals, reconstructions, or restagings of collaborations of master artists. • Revivals, reconstructions, or restagings of works by master artists. • Masterworks of historical or cultural significance. • Masterworks representing newer works or art forms. • Lesser known masterworks or works by master artists unique to the nation, region, or community. Commissions and new works are not eligible.

Projects must be accompanied by related educational, interpretive, or contextual components. These may include discussions, master classes, seminars, exhibitions, program material, or cooperative learning projects with educational or community institutions. Curriculum-based educational components for children and youth must ensure the application of national or state arts education standards.

The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start on or after September 1, 2010. Project activities, which include planning, should begin by April 30, 2011. A grant period of up to two years is allowed.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 2009NEA01AMP
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 30, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 30, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 24, 2009 Application Deadline: Organizations are required to submit their applications electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on September 24, 2009.
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 24, 2009 Application Deadline: Organizations are required to submit their applications electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on September 24, 2009.
Archive Date: Oct 24, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation: Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $100,000
Award Floor: $10,000
CFDA Number(s): 45.024 -- Promotion of the Arts_Grants to Organizations and Individuals
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

NEA Web Site Announcement


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NEA American Masterpieces: Visual Arts Touring, FY 2010 CFDA 45.024

American Masterpieces: Three Centuries of Artistic Genius is a major initiative to acquaint Americans with the best of their cultural and artistic legacy. Through American Masterpieces, the National Endowment for the Arts will sponsor performances, exhibitions, tours, and educational programs across all art forms that will reach large and small communities in all 50 states. This component of American Masterpieces will celebrate the extraordinary and rich evolution of the visual arts in the United States. Applications are due by September 17, 2009.

Through the creation and touring of major exhibitions, art of the highest quality will be experienced by Americans in communities across the nation. Exhibitions may focus on schools, movements, traditions, subject areas, and themes that include but are not limited to: • The Hudson River School • American Impressionism • Native American Art • American Masterworks from Unique Collections including private collections • Aspects of American Art Post-1945 to the Present • Art of the W.P.A. • Latino Art • The Portrait in America • American Na├»ve Art • African American Art • American Photographers and Photography • American Decorative Arts • The Art of the American West • Industrial Design • Architecture • Costume and Textiles • Folk Arts.

The tour of an existing exhibition is eligible. The Arts Endowment’s support of a project may start on or after May 1, 2010. An exhibition must open by May 1, 2012. A grant period of up to four years is allowed.

Exhibitions must be: • Scaled so they can be shown in small and mid-sized exhibiting institutions. • Shown for a period of 8-12 weeks at 2-5 venues which may include the organizing institution. The number of venues should be appropriate to the nature of the works on view. • Accompanied by related educational and interpretive components including brochures and catalogues. Educational material for children and youth must ensure the application of national or state arts education standards.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 2009NEA01AMVAT
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 30, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 30, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Sep 17, 2009 Application Deadline: Organizations are required to submit their applications electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on September 17, 2009.
Current Closing Date for Applications: Sep 17, 2009 Application Deadline: Organizations are required to submit their applications electronically through Grants.gov, the federal government’s online application system. The Grants.gov system must receive your application no later than 11:59 p.m., Eastern Time, on September 17, 2009.
Archive Date: Oct 17, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Arts (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation: Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $300,000
Award Floor: $30,000
CFDA Number(s): 45.024 -- Promotion of the Arts_Grants to Organizations and Individuals
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: Yes

NEA Web Site Announcement

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NEH America's Media Makers Production Grants CFDA 45.164

Grants for America’s Media Makers support projects in the humanities that explore stories, ideas, and beliefs that deepen our understanding of our lives and our world. The Division of Public Programs supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excite, inform, and stir thoughtful reflection upon culture, identity, and history in creative and new ways. Grants for America’s Media Makers should encourage dialogue, discussion, and civic engagement, and they should foster learning among people of all ages. To that end, the Division of Public Programs urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public. Applications are due by August 26, 2009.

NEH offers two categories of grants for media projects, Development Grants and Production Grants. Development grants enable media producers to collaborate with scholars to develop humanities content and format and to prepare programs for production. Development grants should culminate in the refinement of a project’s humanities ideas, a script, or a design document for (or a prototype of) digital media components or projects, or a prototype for a digital media project together with a detailed plan for outreach and public engagement in collaboration with partner organizations. See application guidelines for Development Grants.

Production grants support the preparation of a program for distribution. Applicants must submit a script for a radio or television program, or a prototype or storyboard for a digital media project, that demonstrates a solid command of the humanities ideas and scholarship related to a subject. The script for a radio or television program, or prototype or storyboard for a digital media project, must also show how the narrative elements, visual approach, and interactive design combine to present the project’s humanities ideas. Applicants must have consulted with appropriate scholars about the project and obtained their commitment as advisers. Finally, applicants must have recruited the media team, including at a minimum the producer, director, writer, and, for a digital media project, the interactive designer. Applications may be submitted for any phase of a project. Applicants are not required to obtain a development grant before applying for a production grant. Applicants may not, however, submit multiple applications for the same project at the same deadline. An applicant must choose whether to apply for development or production of a particular project. If an application for a project is already under review, another application for the same project cannot be accepted.

NEH encourages radio, television, and digital media projects that combine radio or television programs with complementary projects using emerging technologies, museum exhibitions, reading and discussion programs, and other formats that expand and enhance programs’ humanities content, deepen the audiences’ experience of the content, engage audiences in new ways, and expand the distribution of programs; advance the role of cultural repositories in online teaching, learning, and research for public audiences, teachers, students, and scholars; culminate in products such as DVDs, Web sites, games, virtual environments, streaming, video on demand, and podcasts, as well as user-generated content; simultaneously produce a broadcast program and interactive companion content in order to extend the educational experience of the program’s audience, use resources efficiently, and keep the humanities ideas at the center of the project as the broadcast program and the interactivity are designed; engage public audiences interactively in exploring humanities ideas and questions by using new ways to contextualize, interpret, and distribute content; result in large-scale, collaborative programs featuring multiple formats; and build new programs around previously funded NEH projects using complementary formats that will add new dimensions to the original project and take advantage of new formats and technologies to reach audiences that were not served by the original project.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20090826-TR
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 23, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 23, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Archive Date: Sep 25, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $1,000,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.164 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Public Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/AmMediaMakers_production.html

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NEH America's Historical and Cultural Organizations: Planning Grants CFDA 45.154

America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations grants support projects in the humanities that explore stories, ideas, and beliefs that deepen our understanding of our lives and our world. The Division of Public Programs supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excite, inform, and stir thoughtful reflection upon culture, identity, and history in creative and new ways. Applications are due by August 26, 2009.

Grants for America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations should encourage dialogue, discussion, and civic engagement, and they should foster learning among people of all ages. To that end, the Division of Public Programs urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public. Planning grants are available for projects that may need further development before applying for implementation. This planning can include the identification and refinement of the project’s main humanities ideas and questions, consultation with scholars in order to strengthen the humanities content, preliminary audience evaluation, preliminary design of the proposed interpretive formats, beta testing of digital formats, development of complementary programming, research at archives or sites whose resources might be used, or the drafting of interpretive materials.

America’s Historical and Cultural Organizations grants support projects that are presented in these formats: traveling exhibitions that are presented at multiple venues; long-term exhibitions at one institution; interpretive Web sites or other digital formats; interpretation of historic places or areas; reading and discussion programs; panel exhibitions that travel widely, reach a broad audience, and take advantage of complementary programming formats (e.g., reading and discussion series, radio, or other media) to enhance the visitor experience; or other project formats that creatively engage audiences in humanities ideas. Applications that make innovative use of emerging technologies are encouraged.

Projects must do more than simply provide a digital archive of material. They should offer new ways of contextualizing and interpreting information that engages public audiences interactively. Applications may, for example, include plans to create PDA tours and resources, podcasts, virtual environments, wiki formats, other formats that utilize user-generated content, virtual imaging, GIS mapping, online scholar-led discussions, streaming video, games, or other digital formats. When it is relevant, applications must explain how user-generated postings to public cyberspace will be vetted by qualified scholars or project staff for accuracy and public educational value. Digital components must rest on sound humanities scholarship and enhance the project’s humanities content for the general public in ways that take unique advantage of the proposed formats.


Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20090826-GE
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 22, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 22, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Archive Date: Sep 25, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity:
Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $75,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s):45.164 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Public Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/AHCO_PlanningGuidelines.html
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NEH America's Media Makers Development Grants CFDA 45.164

Grants for America’s Media Makers support media projects that explore significant events, figures, or developments in the humanities in creative and new ways. America’s Media Makers projects promote active exploration and engagement for broad public audiences in history, literature, archaeology, art history, comparative religion, philosophy, and other fields of the humanities. NEH supports the development of humanities content and interactivity that excites, informs, and stirs thoughtful reflection. To that end, NEH urges applicants to consider more than one format for presenting humanities ideas to the public. Grants for America’s Media Makers should encourage audiences to engage with the humanities, promote dialogue and discussion, and foster learning among people of all ages. Applications are due by August 26, 2009.


Development grants enable media producers to collaborate with scholars to develop humanities content and format and to prepare programs for production. These grants cover a wide range of activities that include, but are not limited to, meetings and individual consultations with scholars, location and archival research, preliminary interviews, preparation of program scripts, designs for interactivity and digital distribution, and the creation of partnerships for outreach activities and public engagement with the humanities. Development grants should culminate in the refinement of the humanities ideas, a script, or a design document for (or a prototype of) digital media components or projects. Development grants may also result in a detailed plan for outreach and public engagement in collaboration with partner organizations. Before applying, applicants must have a solid command of the major humanities scholarship on the subject, have clarified the ideas that the project will consider, and have consulted with a team of scholarly advisers to work out the intellectual issues that the program will explore. Applicants must also have made preliminary decisions about the format and storyline and located essential materials for the program(s). Finally, they must have recruited the appropriate media professionals, especially the producer, writer, or interactive designer. Production grants support the preparation of a program for distribution. Applicants must submit a script for a radio or television program, or a prototype or storyboard for a digital media project, that demonstrates a solid command of the humanities ideas and scholarship about the subject. See application guidelines for Production Grants. Applications may be submitted for any phase of a project.

NEH offers two categories of grants for media projects, Development Grants and Production Grants. Applicants are not required to obtain a development grant before applying for a production grant. Applicants may not, however, submit multiple applications for the same project at the same deadline. An applicant must choose whether to apply for development or production of a particular project. If an application for a project is already under review, another application for the same project cannot be accepted.


Document Type:
Modification to Previous Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20090826-TD
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: Jun 23, 2009
Creation Date: Jun 23, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Aug 26, 2009
Archive Date: Sep 25, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:

Expected Number of Awards:
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $75,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.164 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Public Programs
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/AmMediaMakers_development.html
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Thursday, June 18, 2009

NEH Picturing America School Collaboration Projects CFDA 45.163

Building on the national distribution of Picturing America, the National Endowment for the Humanities invites proposals for local and regional projects that foster collaboration between K-12 educators and humanities scholars to encourage engagement with the rich resources of American art to tell America’s story. The Picturing America School Collaboration Projects grant opportunity is designed to help teachers and librarians whose schools display the Picturing America images form connections with courses in the core curriculum. These projects will be grounded in the great works of art included in Picturing America, which is part of the Endowment’s We the People program. Applications are due by October 7, 2009.


Information about Picturing America, including the Picturing America Teachers Resource Book, can be found by visiting the Picturing America Web site. The images in Picturing America reflect a variety of media spanning several centuries, ranging from the work of early American Indian artists to painters such as Mary Cassatt and Jacob Lawrence, from photographers such as Dorothea Lange to architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright.

These images will help students better understand America’s diverse people and places and connect them to our nation’s travails and triumphs. This history is reflected in the themes of Picturing America: Leadership, Freedom and Equality, Democracy, Courage, Landscape, and Creativity and Ingenuity. Goals of the Picturing America School Collaboration Projects grants are:

  • to strengthen understanding of the connections between great works of American art and significant events, themes, and topics in the American experience; to encourage local and regional collaboration between K-12 educators and humanities experts who can bring appropriate knowledge to the integration of American artworks in core subjects;
  • to foster discussion of how to use the Picturing America images among K-12 educators within a locality or region;
  • and to provide access to rich scholarly resources and primary materials that support teaching.

In order to provide a forum for exploring and deepening students’ understanding of art, American history, government, social studies, literature, language arts, civics, and other core subjects, funded projects should:

  • support one or more conferences of one or two days each;
  • accommodate at each conference twenty-four to one hundred (or more) participants, all of whom would have access to the Picturing America portfolio; and
  • provide opportunities for participants to engage with scholars, museum and library professionals, and other experts.

Successful proposals will present a conference schedule of plenary and concurrent sessions in engaging formats that provide opportunities for participants to:

  • observe or demonstrate models for teaching American art, history, and culture with the Picturing America portfolio and accompanying Teachers Resource Book;
  • explore the curricular value of visual literacy for core subjects (for example, using images in the teaching of history or literature as a powerful investigative tool, a stimulus to Socratic inquiry, or a catalyst to improve student writing); and
  • develop individual or team plans with mentoring resources, as available.

Successful applicants will also provide plans for post-conference support for participants as well as for Picturing America portfolio recipients unable to attend the onsite activities. Post-conference activities will include:

  • use of listservs or e-newsletters to connect participants to an array of resources, including each other, and to assist with exchange and discussion around experiences using new materials and approaches;
  • dissemination of the resources of the conference on a public Web site that could include online audio and video and transcribed conference presentations; and
  • publication of the results of instructional initiatives in digital or print form and presentations or other in-service activities.

Conference organizers will invite applications from Picturing America recipients and make selections according to criteria they establish to determine the quality of proposed school initiatives and the appropriateness of follow-up plans, both for the grade level(s) and any relevant learning frameworks.

Proposals to provide opportunities for teachers with limited access to professional development in the humanities are encouraged. These conferences may include public school teachers, teachers at charter schools, members of home school consortia, and faculty of private license schools. Host institutions should arrange adequate housing for the participants, who will pay for it from the stipends.

Projects must have a plan for evaluation that will provide firm evidence of each participant’s success in accomplishing proposed instructional goals. Projects must require a product as evidence of each participant’s or team’s new knowledge or increased skills, such as new lesson plans, course materials, library enhancements, or a research paper. Master teachers may be involved to assist participants in carrying out school projects or the construction of new learning resources.

Funds may be used to pay for consulting scholars, books and other materials, logistical support, and appropriate released time for project staff.

Types of projects not supported
Picturing America School Collaboration Projects grants do not support:

  • empirical social scientific research;
  • specific policy studies;
  • educational or technical impact assessments;
  • work undertaken in the pursuit of an academic degree;
  • the preparation or publication of textbooks;
  • projects that focus on pedagogical theory, research on educational methods, tests, or measurements;
  • cognitive psychology; or
  • projects devoted to advocacy.

Document Type: Grants Notice
Funding Opportunity Number: 20091007-AP
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Posted Date: May 26, 2009
Creation Date: May 26, 2009
Original Closing Date for Applications: Oct 07, 2009
Current Closing Date for Applications: Oct 07, 2009
Archive Date: Nov 06, 2009
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Humanities (see "Cultural Affairs" in CFDA)
Category Explanation:
Expected Number of Awards: 30
Estimated Total Program Funding:
Award Ceiling: $75,000
Award Floor: $0
CFDA Number(s): 45.163 -- Promotion of the Humanities_Professional Development
Cost Sharing or Matching Requirement: No

http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/pascp.html

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